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David Hines [userpic]

ART: "undaunted"

September 7th, 2009 (05:37 pm)
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Hey, Photobucket is working for me again! Fortunately, this weekend I produced a render that does not entirely suck, so here you go.


look out! skellies!!


Resources credited in the image, titles added in Photoshop, no other post work, as I've seen folks say on the 3d art forums. Every culture has its own etiquette! (Although I suspect at least half the reason folks give credit isn't just to say "thanks" to the folks who made the model/texture/resource but so other artists can fill out their shopping lists. Seriously, I tell you, it's like playing with dolls.) Usually you credit resources and tools in the text of your announcement, rather than the actual image, but I thought this would be neat.

Constructive criticism is welcome. I didn't do any post work in Photoshop because I'm trying to learn DAZ Studio and figure out its and my (mostly my) shortcomings. Some things are a little puzzling. I have no idea where that blue bleed-through in the lower left came from, for instance, and while the overhead light came off very well on the skeletons it turned my warrior *surprisingly* red in the final render. Maybe it's because she's dark-skinned, and the skeletons have a clean "anatomical specimen" texture? Lighting is the trickiest thing about this so far. I am totally faking it. Gonna post this in a 3D art comm or two, see what they say.

Comments

Posted by: Mari (marici)
Posted at: September 7th, 2009 10:15 pm (UTC)

I find it a little frustrating that I can't see the centurion well -- I didn't guess it was a woman till you said so, and her face is completely lost. Interesting image, but maybe a bit more of the moon-photograph backscatter light off your sand?

Posted by: •• the years oƒ living ∂angerously happy •• (nightengale)
Posted at: September 9th, 2009 05:21 am (UTC)
game face on >D

Although I suspect at least half the reason folks give credit isn't just to say "thanks" to the folks who made the model/texture/resource but so other artists can fill out their shopping lists. Seriously, I tell you, it's like playing with dolls.

*very quiet snicker*

And to actually answer your point, yes, it's *more* than half the reason, at least in the doll community. When you're listing off where you got the shoes, blouse, eyes, wig, hair clips, necklace from....and indeed, when a routine part of the introduction (and reintroductions) of every doll is the make and mold names, it's not really credit at all, at the root. If you or a friend made the items, it's advertisement for potential commission business. If a company or unrelated seller made the items...well, you're just letting everyone else know where to send their credit card. :)

Though, don't car enthusiasts do the same thing? And so on and so forth. I think people like to be able to see what pieces came together in what ways, and citing sources makes that more possible. Especially in a medium like your 3D picture here, where an untrained eye, like mine, can't tell at all what pieces and what lighting effects were used.

And a short line in terms of critique: Your centurion is unnaturally dimly lit, for how bright the rest of the scene is. Can't see her, and that's a shame.

Posted by: cmar_wingnut (cmar_wingnut)
Posted at: September 9th, 2009 04:24 pm (UTC)

I like it. Is it based on the wonderful skeleton fight in Jason and the Argonauts?

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